Tribe at center of pipeline protests launches solar farm

CANNON BALL, N.D. — The American Indian tribe at the center of tumultuous protests against the Dakota Access pipeline plans to unveil a solar farm Friday that came about partly due to the tribe's fierce opposition to the oil pipeline's environmental impact.

Located just 3 miles (5 kilometers) from the pipeline, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's solar project is meant as a first step toward clean energy independence and a way to power all 12 of the reservation communities in North Dakota and South Dakota. It also shows that the protests that began in 2016 and ended in 2017 weren't for naught, even though the pipeline began carrying oil more than two years ago, said Cody Two Bears, the project leader and executive director of Indigenized Energy, which promotes energy within the Sioux Nation.

Two Bears said the solar project "pays tribute to everyone who's come to Standing Rock and all their hard work and tireless dedication toward protecting our people and land."

Organizers invited actors Shailene Woodley and Mark Ruffalo, two vocal opponents of the pipeline, presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard, and other public figures to a Friday evening kickoff event. Ruffalo, co-founder of The Solutions Project, a nonprofit that promotes clean and renewable energy, and Woodley visited the protest camp where thousands of people lived for months and sometimes clashed with law enforcement. More than 700 people were arrested during the protests.

Ann Marie Bledsoe Downes, an executive with the economic development entity of Nebraska's Winnebago Tribe, which began dabbling in solar energy a decade ago, said the national interest around the protests should translate into promotion of renewable energy.

"Tribes have always been strong advocates and set the marker to where we need to be on," Bledsoe Downes said. "If there's any good from what happened at the DAPL protest, I hope that it was a catalyst to that."

Numerous tribes have turned to solar power and other forms of green energy in the last decade as a way of creating jobs and cutting down on energy costs without harming the environment. Bledsoe Downes said the Winnebago Tribe is saving $100,000 a year, money that "goes back into housing or down payment assistance or tribal roads or infrastructure costs or youth programming."

Several solar energy nonprofits joined forces to build the $470,000 Standing Rock facility, and those organizations are billing it as the largest solar energy farm in North Dakota. It currently powers the Sioux Nation Community Center and Veterans Memorial Building.

Hayes Barnard, president of San Francisco-based GivePower Foundation, which made the largest donation of $370,000, said the solar farm is a "testament to the tribe's steadfast commitment to going beyond protesting and inciting real change."

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